Saskia van de Gevel

Saskia van de Gevel

DR. SASKIA L. VAN DE GEVEL

Rankin Science West 367

828-262-7028

gevelsv@appstate.edu

 Ph.D., Geography, The University of Tennessee, 2008

M.S., Forest Ecology, Southern Illinois University, 2002

B.S., Forest Science, Pennsylvania State University, 2000

CURRICULUM VITAE

 

 RESEARCH

 Endangered Mountain Forest Ecosystems, Dendrochronology, Biogeography, and Climate Change

My research interests are focused on endangered mountain forest ecosystems in eastern U.S. forests and high-elevation mountain ecosystems in the northern Rocky Mountains. I have three major research foci including: (1) quantifying the influence of native and exotic insects/diseases in eastern and western U.S. forest communities, (2) reconstructing disturbance and land-use history patterns in the eastern deciduous forest on varying spatial scales, and (3) examining long-term climate and forest disturbance trends in endangered whitebark pine ecosystems.

 I conduct my research in the Department of Geography and Planning’s Appalachian Tree Ring Lab. I am currently sharing the lab with Dr. Pete Soule, Dr. Mark Spond, and undergraduate and graduate students interested in pursuing tree-ring and biogeographical research.

 

TEACHING

My teaching philosophy emphasizes student learning through hands-on experience in the classroom and in the field, relating the excitement of scientific discovery, and encouraging students to engage in internships, study abroad programs, and experiencing other cultures. I teach the following courses:

  • GHY 1010 (Introduction to Physical Geography): Basic concepts and elements of the physical environment: the earth and its place in the solar system, weather, world climate classification, vegetation, and biomes.
  • GHY 1012 (Global Change of the Biosphere):  A study of spatial and temporal patterns within the biosphere (e.g., global biodiversity patterns), the interrelated processes that create such patterns (e.g., climate zonation, seasonality), and examination of how biotic patterns and processes have changed through time due to both natural and anthropogenic forcing mechanisms (e.g., past climate variability, current global warming, habitat loss, invasive species).
  • GHY 3110 (Vegetation, Soils, and Landforms): Advanced-level physical geography course. A comprehensive study of our physical earth, emphasizing the distributional patterns and interrelations of natural vegetation, soils, and landforms. Throughout the course we will focus on the global impact of humans on the natural environment.
  • GHY 3530 (Study Abroad - Environmental Geography of the Alps): Students demonstrate an understanding of climate change and glacial retreat, ecological processes in the subalpine and alpine zones, and an understanding of alpine vegetation patterns and palaeoecology in the Eastern Alps.

  • GHY 3530 (Study Abroad - Biogeography of Costa Rica): Students demonstrate an understanding of the links between climate change, El Nino Southern Oscillation cycles, and ecological processes in Costa Rica.
  • GHY/PLN 4830 (Senior Seminar): Provides a ‘capstone’ experience for graduating Geography majors, with a balance between academic and practical experiences. Topics generally covered include: resume design and cover letter writing, portfolio development, preparation for job interviews, internship experiences, and graduate school opportunities.

 

PUBLICATIONS

Mark D. Spond, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Henri D. Grissino-Mayer. 2014. Climate-growth relationships for Rocky Mountain juniper (Juniperus scopulorum Sarg.) on the volcanic badlands of western New Mexico, U.S.A. Dendrochronologia 32: 137–143. PDF

Philip B. White, Peter T. Soulé, and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2014. Impacts of human disturbance on the temporal stability of climate-growth relationships in a red spruce forest, Southern Appalachian Mountains, U.S.A. Dendrochronologia 32: 71-77. PDF

Nicholas Fuhrman, Chris Morgan, Carolyn Copenheaver, John Peterson, Milton Newberry, Sara DeLoach, and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2014. Repeated monitoring of forest plots: Evaluating the accuracy of student scientist data.  NACTA Journal 58(2): 95-101. PDF

Saskia L. van de Gevel, Justin L. Hart, Mark D. Spond, Philip B. White, Megan N. Sutton, and Henri Grissino-Mayer. 2012. American chestnut to northern red oak: a forest dynamics study in the Blue Ridge Mountains, North Carolina, U.S.A. Botany 90: 1263-1275.

Philip B. White, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Peter T. Soulé
2012. Succession and disturbance in an endangered red spruce-Fraser fir forest in the southern Appalachian Mountains, North Carolina, U.S.A. Endangered Species Research 18: 17–25.

Philip B. White, Saskia L. van de Gevel, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, and Lisa B. LaForest. 2011. Climatic response of oak species across an environmental gradient in the southern Appalachian Mountains, U.S.A. Tree-Ring Research 67(1): 27–37.

Justin L. Hart, Saskia L. van de Gevel, John Sakulich, and Henri D. Grissino-Mayer.  2010. Influence of climate and disturbance on the growth of Tsuga canadensis at its southern limit. Trees 24: 621–633.

Justin L. Hart, David A. Austin, and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2010. Radial Growth responses of three co-occurring species to small canopy disturbances in a secondary hardwood forest on the Cumberland Plateau, Tennessee. Physical Geography 31(2): 1–22.

Evan R. Larson, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Henri D. Grissino-Mayer. 2009. Variability in fire regimes of high-elevation whitebark pine communities, western Montana, U.S.A. Ecoscience 16(3): 282–298.

Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Lisa B. LaForest, and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2009. Construction history of the Rocky Mount Historic Site, Piney Flats, Tennessee from tree-ring and documentary evidence. Southeastern Archaeology 28(1): 64–77.

Saskia L. van de Gevel, Justin L. Hart, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, and Ken W. Robinson. 2009. Tree-ring dating of old-growth longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) logs from an exposed timber crib dam, Hope Mills, North Carolina, U.S.A. Tree-Ring Research 65(1): 69–80.

Joseph P. Henderson, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Justin L. Hart.     2009. The historical dendroarchaeology of the Hoskins House, Tannenbaum Historic Park, Greensboro, North Carolina. Tree-Ring Research 65(1): 37–45.

Sara A. Blankenship, Meta G. Pike, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Henri D. Grissino-Mayer. 2009. The dendroarchaeology of Cagle Saltpetre Cave: A nineteenth century saltpeter mining site in Van Buren County, Tennessee. Tree-Ring Research 65(1): 11–22.

Justin L. Hart, Saskia L. van de Gevel, and Henri D. Grissino-Mayer. 2008. Disturbance dynamics in a natural area of the southern Ridge and Valley, Tennessee. Natural  Areas Journal 28(3): 275–289.

Justin L. Hart, Saskia L. van de Gevel, David F. Mann, and Wayne K. Clatterbuck. 2008. Legacy of charcoaling in a Western Highland Rim forest in Tennessee.  American Midland Naturalist 159: 238–250.

Henri D. Grissino-Mayer and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2007. Tell-tale trees: the historical dendroarchaeology of log structures at Rocky Mount, Piney Flats, Tennessee. Historical Archaeology 41(4): 32–49.

Saskia L. van de Gevel and Charles M. Ruffner. 2006. Land-use history and resulting forest succession in the Illinois Ozark Hills. In: David S. Buckley and Wayne K. Clatterbuck (Editors). Proceedings, 15th Central Hardwood Forest Conference, February 28–March 1, 2006, Knoxville, Tennessee. USDA Forest Service General Technical Report SRS-101: 719–726, Asheville, North Carolina.

Saskia L. van de Gevel, Henri D. Grissino-Mayer, and Evan R. Larson. 2005. Dendroecological applications for whitebark pine ecosystems. Nutcracker Notes 9:6–7.

Marc D. Abrams, Carolyn A. Copenheaver, Bryan A. Black, and Saskia L. van de Gevel. 2001.  Dendroecology and balsam fir decline in a relic, old-growth, bog forest in the central Ridge and Valley Province. Canadian Journal of Botany 79: 58–69.

Marc D. Abrams, Saskia L. van de Gevel, Ryan C. Dodson, and Carolyn A. Copenheaver. 2000. The dendroecology and climate impacts for old-growth white pine and hemlock on the extreme slopes of the Berkshire Hills, Massachusetts. Canadian Journal of Botany 78: 851–861.

RESEARCH GRANTS AND AWARDS

Appalachian Women Scientists SEED Grant, 2013-2014. Cratis D. Williams Graduate School and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University, $1,972.

Historic Preservation Contract, 2013. Using Tree-Ring Samples to Determine Terminus Post Quem Dates for Archaeological Dam Sites in the Chattahoochee River. Southern Research, Historic Preservation Consultants, Inc., 2013. Peter T. Soulé and Saskia L. van de Gevel (CO-PIs). $3,806.

Historic Preservation Contract, 2012. Tree-Ring Analysis of Industrial Archaeological Sites in the Chattahoochee River. Southern Research, Historic Preservation Consultants, Inc., 2012-2013. Peter T. Soulé and Saskia L. van de Gevel (CO-PIs). $2,617.

Finalist for the Appalachian Global Leadership Award, Fall 2012, Appalachian State University. The Global Leadership Awards Program is an annual award to recognize students, faculty and staff who have made a significant contribution to advance global learning at Appalachian.

Finalist for The Great Courses to teach a Physical Geography DVD Lecture Series, Spring 2012. The Great Courses brings engaging professors into peoples’ homes through college courses on DVD. The Great Courses offers over 390 courses for lifelong learners (http://www.thegreatcourses.com/).

Finalist for the Wayne D. Duncan Teaching Award, Spring 2012, Appalachian State University.

Graduate Research Associate Mentoring (GRAM) Award, 2011-2013. Cratis D. Williams Graduate School and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University, $20,000.

University Research Council Grant, 2011-2012. Cratis D. Williams Graduate School and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University, $2,824.

Undergraduate Research Assistantships, 2009-2010. Office of Student Research, Appalachian State University, $2,000.

USDA Higher Education Challenge Grant, 2009. Dr. Nicholas E. Fuhrman and Dr. A. Christian Morgan from the University of Georgia and Dr. Carolyn A. Copenheaver and Dr. John R. Seiler from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The purpose of the Ambassadors for Conservation Education (ACE) Program is to recruit a larger, more diverse student body to natural resource and agricultural communication degree programs, $364,000.

Wachovia Environmental Research Award, 2009. Cratis D. Williams Graduate School and Office of Research and Sponsored Programs, Appalachian State University, $500.

Foundation Fellows Grant, 2009. Hubbard Center for Faculty Development, Appalachian State University. Applying the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning to Mountain Geography Field-Based Courses, $5,000.

The Nature Conservancy, 2009. Forest Stand Dynamics of a Natural Area in the Southern Appalachians, Bluff Mountain, North Carolina, $3,000.

Undergraduate Research Assistantship, 2009. Office of Student Research, Appalachian State University, $1,000.

Student Publication Award, 2008. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Professional Development Award, 2008. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Leadership Award, 2007. North American Dendroecological Fieldweek, Great Smoky Mountains National Park at Tremont, Tennessee.

Stewart K. McCroskey Memorial Fund Award, 2006. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, to support attending the 6th International Winter School: “Wood Anatomy of Tree Rings,” in Davos Laret, Switzerland, $500.

Honorable Mention, Student Paper Competition, 7th International Conference on Dendrochronology, Beijing, China. 2006.

Outstanding Teaching Associate Award, 2006. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Student Publication Award, 2006. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee. W.K. McClure Fund for the Study of World Affairs, 2006. University of Tennessee, $3,000.

National Science Foundation Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement Grant, 2005. to support field research on whitebark pine communities in the Northern Rocky Mountains, $9,998.

Robert G. Long Outstanding Graduate Student of the Year Award, 2005. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Graduate School Travel Grant, 2005. University of Tennessee, to present at the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation meeting, Glacier National Park, Montana, $400.

Stewart K. McCroskey Memorial Fund Award, 2003. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee, to support attending the 14th Annual North American Dendroecological Fieldweek, Itasca, Minnesota, and to present at the Whitebark Pine Ecosystem Foundation meeting, Waterton Lakes National Park, Canada $900.

Graduate School Travel Grant, 2003. University of Tennessee, to present at the 100th Annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, $200.

Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant, 2003. Department of Geography, University of Tennessee.

Datatel Scholars Foundation, 2002. Southern Illinois University, for academic excellence, $1,300.

Nominee, Southern Illinois University, Outstanding Thesis Award, 2002.

Diversity Scholarship, 2002. Society of American Foresters, to present at the Society of American Foresters Annual meeting, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, $500.

 

 


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